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Article

How population health enhances the health care experience

Health care is suffering. Rising costs, disconnected and symptom-focused care is systemic. And the effects are profound. Health care should support people, healthy, sick, or in-between.

If you’d like insights into an individualized and holistic population health approach for your employees, read our perspective paper.

Download the perspective paper.

Article

Personalized Health and Well-being

Less than three percent of Americans live a healthy lifestyle.1   Why? Because making healthier choices isn’t always easy.
When people don’t know where to start, they just don’t. But, with ActiveHealth’s Lifestyle and Condition Coaching program, that’s about to change.

How It Works

1. Power personal insights

The key to personalization is data – what we know and how we use it.

• Powerful predictive analytics - We analyze clinical, behavioral, self-reported and consumer data. Then we create a 360-degree view of each person.

• Personalized plans – Each plan includes the right mix of digital and clinical support. Your employees will get practical, actionable advice designed to create lasting behavior change.

2. Amplify engagement

The Why – We designed the program to uncover the intrinsic motivations because they inspire long term change.

The How – Then we build a personalized experience around them.

• Multi-channel access lets your employees meet us where and when they choose. Telephonic, group coaching, on-site or digital coaching.
• The Active Health Index helps us build personalized care plans. It prioritizes actions that are most urgent and most likely to make a long-term impact on health.
• The MyActiveHealthSM member engagement platform is the digital gateway to health and well-being. Digital tools, programs and resources are neatly packed into a vibrant and engaging online experience.

The Nudge – We stay with our members every step of the way with timely, strategic encouragement  that helps them stay engaged.

3. Advance health and well-being

First, we look for specific, primary conditions. But once we connect with participants, we can do much more. We can support more than 40 topics, including:

• Weight management
• Chronic back/neck pain
• Stress management
• Diabetes
• Sleep
• Pre-diabetes
• Coronary artery disease
• Tobacco cessation
• Pre-hypertension
• Asthma
• Heart failure
• Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Digital and clinical coaching support is a winning combination. Your employees will have a real possibility to create long-term behavior change.  They’ll have a chance to work toward their best health on their terms – when they want it, how they want it.

 

 

 

 

 

 


1 Source: Loprinzi, Paul D. et al. Healthy Lifestyle Characteristics and Their Joint Association With Cardiovascular Disease Biomarkers in US Adults. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Volume 91 , Issue 4 , 432 – 442. Available at http://www.mayoclinicproceedings.org/article/S0025-6196(16)00043-4/abstract. Accessed September 21, 2017.  ©2018 ActiveHealth Management, Inc. This material is for informational purposes only and is neither an offer of coverage nor medical advice. It contains only a partial, general description of program and services and does not constitute a contract. Information provided through such programs and services is not a substitute for diagnosis or treatment by a physician or other health care professional. This information is believed accurate as of the product date; however, it is subject to change.

 

Article

Living Well: Stay healthy as you age

Healthy habits are key.

Taking care of your body is the key to good health at every age. It can help slow down or even prevent problems that often come with getting older. And even if certain diseases run in your family, you can still enjoy your golden years. It’s never too late to start good habits

Here are some tips for staying healthy as you age:

  1. Staying active: Regular physical activity keeps your body strong and helps you feel better. It also makes you less likely to get depressed. You might want to think about walking, gardening or working out at the gym.
  2. Staying connected: Staying in touch with friends, family, and neighbors is good for your mental health. But try to take time for yourself, too. Spending 20 minutes a day just to relax is great for body and spirit.
  3. Staying sharp: Try to keep your brain active. Learn or do something new and different. Attend an educational workshop or learn a new card game. There are lots of fun ways to stay mentally sharp.

ActiveHealth Coach Tip:
Coach Jayne's healthy aging tip:

My tip for healthy aging is to eat a well-balanced diet to ensure you are getting all of the nutrients you need for your body to work in its prime! Some tips on healthy eating include:

  • Top your favorite whole grain cereal or oatmeal with fruits, seeds, or nuts
  • Use herbs and spices instead of salt to flavor your food
  • Buy frozen when certain vegetables and fruits are not in season

Jayne is an Onsite Health Coach for ActiveHealth. As a coach, Jayne enjoys motivating others to make healthy lifestyle changes. She enjoys helping people find what works best for them to maintain their changes for a better quality of life!

The information provided by ActiveHealth Management’s health and wellness programs is general in nature. It is not meant to replace the advice or care you get from your doctor or other health professional. If you have specific health care needs or would like more complete health information, please see your doctor or other health care provider.  ActiveHealth is a registered or service marks of ActiveHealth Management, Inc. © 2018 ActiveHealth Management, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Article

The 40% factor of Health and Well-being

Your overall health and well-being are more than the health care you’re getting when you visit your doctor. Your behavior alone has a 40 percent impact on it. We have an opportunity to help people get on the path to better health; in fact, it’s our mission. Read this inside perspective from Mohamed Diab, President, and CEO of ActiveHealth about how we can help transform health and well-being.

Download the perspective paper.

Woman and man working
Article

Infographic: A Healthy Workforce is Good for Business

Employers shoulder the growing costs of health care – more than $36B annually.

  • Americans are sicker today than ever before
  • Employers shoulder growing health care costs
  • Every year, medical problems cause employees to miss work or not perform at their best, resulting in lower productivity and driving up health care costs

Promoting healthier behaviors by supporting employee wellness programs can pay off­ . Healthy employees are more productive, miss fewer days of work, and help keep health care costs down.

View ActiveHealth’s new infographic to learn how employers can face this workplace challenge.

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Article

Using Analytics to Promote Safe and Effective Opioid Use

We’ve been committed to helping people find their best health for over 20 years. Part of that mission is recognizing and responding to emerging health care concerns. Right now, there’s a growing epidemicof opioid misuse in the U.S. Together, we can help fight it.

Put our data to work
Our patented CareEngine technology includes thousands of Care ConsiderationSM alerts that are:
• Validated by Harvard Medical School
• Shaped by evidence-based sources, like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and peer-reviewed journals

The CareEngine captures data from a wide variety of sources – not just the basics, like pharmacy and claims data. We want to create a picture that’s as holistic as possible. So, we’ve integrated health assessment data that allows us to include the member’s self-perception as well. We’re constantly looking for new sources of data. This lets us produce more accurate alerts and refine our clinical analytical models. And, we can specifically target areas of interest, like safe and effective opioid use.

Make the right connections

We apply evidence-based rules to help spot people using opioids in ways that aren’t consistent with CDC guidelines. They have a higher risk for adverse clinical outcomes, dependency and abuse. Pain management isn’t the only area we’re watching though. A 2017 study showed that 16 percent of Americans have diagnosed behavioral health conditions. But, they account for more than 50 percent of opioid prescriptions.4 So, we also look specifically for areas where opioid use and behavioral health conditions intersect.

Get the right message to the right people
As important as it is to find these opportunities to intervene, it’s important to know when not to. We apply exclusion criteria, like hospice involvement or an advanced illness diagnosis. This helps us ensure that we’re reaching out in ways that are sensitive and appropriate.

Envision an end to the epidemic
Since our founding, our mission has been to help members live their healthiest lives. It’s at the heart of everything we do. This advanced analytics package has the resources and strategy you need to help promote the safe, effective use of opioids.

Together we can make a difference.

Connect with us to learn more.

 

 

 

1,2 2016 National Survey on Drug Use and Health Accessible at: https://www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/NSDUH-DetTabs-2016/NSDUH...
3 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) data, July 2016 – September 2017. Accessible at: https://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/opioid-overdoses/index.html
4 Davis, Matthew A et al. Prescription Opioid Use among Adults with Mental Health Disorders in the United States. Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine. July – August 2017. Accessed March 20, 2018. Available at: http://www.jabfm.org/content/30/4/407.full?sid=cc11a6c0-530c-4d62-b0c8-d...

Woman looking at prescription
Webinar

Webinar: Combat the Opioid Epidemic with Evidence-based Analytics

View Now

Opioids are an important part of modern medicine that have improved the quality of life for millions of people. However, we find ourselves amidst an opioid epidemic that continues to escalate. Studies show that 11.5 million people misused prescription opioids1, with economic costs reaching $504 billion2.

In this webinar, join us to learn how to:

Identify and address the significant connection between behavioral health and the misuse of opioids
Leverage evidenced-based analytics to identify health improvement opportunities for members whose pain management may be at variance with the CDC guidelines for opioid use and may be putting them at risk
Actively coordinate communication between providers and patients around pain management and opioid use risks
Deploy targeted care management services stratified for your population at high, moderate or low risk for opioid related events

Speakers:

Dr. Jonathan S. Rubens
Chief Medical Officer, ActiveHealth

Ms. Nancy Slattery
Clinical Team Lead, ActiveHealth

Dr. Gianna Bryan
Clinical Pharmacy Manager, ActiveHealth

 

 

1 2016 National Survey on Drug Use and Health Accessible at:https://www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/NSDUH-DetTabs-2016/NSDUH...
2 Mortality in the United States, 2016 NCHS Data Brief No. 293, December 2017. Accessible at:https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db293.pdf

Event

2018 America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP) Institute & Expo

ActiveHealth Management participated in AHIP's Institute & Expo in San Diego, CA June 20-22, 2018 . This year’s Institute brought together professionals from around the country to share solid ideas and build smart partnerships on topics ranging from population health to utilizing technology, data, and analytics.

Conference attendees connected with ActiveHealth representatives to learn more about the power of using evidence-based analytics to create winning solutions to help organizations improve the health of its population and achieve cost savings.

Improving the health and well-being of your population isn't always easy. The health care experience can be confusing and impersonal. We're here to change that. For more than 20 years, we've helped organizations like yours with:

  • Evidence-based population health solutions
  • Advanced clinical analytics to drive specific engagement
  • Highly personalized, targeted and simple member experiences

Connect with us to learn how we can help your organization!

Article

Improving Engagement with Wearable Devices

Curious about whether or not a fitness device is good tool to help you reach your fitness goals?

The jury is still out on the long term effectiveness of wearable fitness devices across a broad population. We all know someone who had a device, used it religiously for a while and then lost interest. However, we are starting to see statistics stating that a majority of employees continue to use their fitness devices six months after their employers launch their wellness program.

According to our head of customer engagement, she personally is happy to report that she is one of those people who has worn a Fitbit for more than four years.

Her motivation to start wearing a device was curiousity, "I was curious about how much activity I was actually getting. As it turns out, the answer was ‘not much’. I was only averaging about 2,000 steps during the work day. I learned that I was hardly moving at all during the daytime hours and I was getting most of my activity in at the gym in the evening. If we believe that sitting is the new smoking, I was well on my way to poor future health".

She found that wearing her Fitbit helped her figure out how to get at least 10,000 steps per day, it also helped her change her routine so that she was getting more activity throughout the day. "I try to get 500-600 steps per hour while I am working during the day. That means changing things up – I now look for opportunities to move! Sometimes, I walk in place while participating in a conference call. My one-on- one meetings with my team have become walking meetings. I take the long route to the bathroom and I park my car in the far corner of the lot. I also take the stairs instead of the elevator whenever possible". She also found ways to build in opportunities for what she calls "bonus steps” - such as offering to take the trip to get things other people need. Another key to her long-term use of her device - her close circle of friends and family members who wear devices as well. This has afforded many great opportunities for friendly competitions to see who accumulates the most steps.

Overall, she has found that her Fitbit and daily activities are now habits for her, "I feel great and will continue to track my activity so that I contribute to my best possible future health. I do believe that we are seeing the beginning of a broader trend that will likely continue to have an impact on improving overall health. Whether is it a wearable device or an app used with a smartphone, individuals are waking up to the need to move".

Interested in how wearables can be an effective tool to help engage employees in healthier habits? Download our tip sheet to find out how wearables are being used in wellness programs and a quick guide to some of the most popular devices and apps.

Wearable Device Tip Sheet - Download Now!